PICO'S ARCHIVE

  • On March 25, OCO and EBAYC held a 300-person action at Fremont High School to highlight our partnership and shared vision with our elected and district leaders around creating a transformed educational future for Oakland high school students. With a graduation rate of only 63% for all OUSD students and a dropout rate of 28% for African-American and Latino students, our vision of high school transformation includes equitable Linked Learning that ensures structures in which students feel connected and valued, teachers are supported in developing their practice and have time for collaboration, academics are rigorous and relevant, career pathways include workplace-based learning opportunities, and programs and services address the needs of young people.

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  • On Feb. 26, the Oakland Unified School District Board agreed to send the $1.5 million promised to schools after our leaders and partners showed up, spoke out and made clear that the district needed to fulfill its promise of making sure basic needs were met at each school. Since our community helped win Prop. 30, Measure J and LCFF, we have been pressing the board to send that money to schools that need it the most. The board has shown leadership and a commitment to equity. However, the board took longer than planned to distribute some of that money to schools, even though boardmembers passed a budgeting policy in January that promised to send more support to students with the greatest need. This is why we’ve continued to fight to get the board to fulfill its promise.

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  • While we didn’t win everything that we wanted in 2013, we certainly had some superstar moments. We turned up the heat on several fronts and engaged leaders in multiple campaigns. While the work sometimes seemed endless and the light at the end of the tunnel seemed far away, we had faith that God would be with us every step of the way until things changed.

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  • On June 14, 2003, Barbara and her husband Olu lost their son, Olutokumbo Oluwole, to gun violence on the streets of Oakland on his 22nd birthday. As active churchgoers, they were determined that their son’s death would not be in vain. Barbara started the Night Walks, where each Friday evening, community residents and clergy walk the streets in Oakland neighborhoods to encourage residents to put down their guns, and to organize other residents to insist on safety for themselves and their children. OCO has mobilized hundreds of Oakland residents on Friday Night Walks over the last year to take responsibility for stopping gun violence in their neighborhoods. Will you help them?

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  • Our Lifelines works has been picking up over the last couple of months. We co-hosted a community strategy meeting in Berkeley to figure out how to reverse California’s trend of having the largest number of prisoners in the country. That meeting was full of energy and kicked off a series of meetings in Fresno and one more taking place in Los Angeles. We held a community meeting with Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson and other partners to get input on the proposed Community Advisory Board, which the Alameda County Board of Supervisors have been directed to form as part of the county’s response to the historic prison Realignment process that has been underway for the past two years. Another one is planned with Supervisor Nate Miley on Nov. 5.

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  • Ken Johnson joined the OCO staff this summer as our new Chief Operating Officer. In this role, he will manage the fund development, finance, data and administrative operations of the organization, and he will work closely with our Executive Director as part of the management team. Learn more about him.

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  • With a unanimous vote, the OCO membership elected the new board for 2013-15 at the 36th anniversary convention on June 18. The new board members include some longtime OCO members and some new, and they hail from all walks of life and all parts of Oakland—a true representation of the leadership this city needs going […]

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  • On Day 4 of the PICO National Training near Atlanta, participants were coached on PICO’s organizing model and how organizing works in the real world. OCO leader Rev. Phillip Lewis, senior pastor of Israelite Baptist Church, shares his thoughts about what he took away from the conference.

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  • Rev. Curtis Flemming, pastor of Bay Community Fellowship, shares his thoughts on his experience at the PICO National Training near Atlanta. Throughout the conference, participants were trained how to mobilize people using PICO’s faith-based model. In meeting the rest of the participants and becoming a new OCO leader, Rev. Flemming says that he sees the […]

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  • In this interview, OCO leader Rev. Curtis Robinson (pastor of Faith Baptist Church) talks about his experience at the PICO National Training near Atlanta. On Day 3 of the conference, participants were engaged in a conversation about power and the importance of building relationships with people so that our communities can be empowered.

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OCO and its affiliates are non-partisan and are not aligned explicitly or implicitly with any candidate or party. We do not endorse or support candidates for office.