Author Archives OCO Staff

  • Alameda County is now accepting applications for the Community Corrections Partnership Community Advisory Board (CAB).

    The role of the CAB is to advise and make recommendations to the Community Corrections Partnership Executive Committee (CCPEC) on issues pertaining to realignment/reentry.

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  • Oakland’s students have been waiting too long to receive the education they deserve. The dropout rates for African-Americans and Latinos are too high, and the graduation rates are far too low.

    Students who graduate aren’t necessarily ready for college or to move into jobs with dignity. We can’t wait any longer. We have waited long enough.

    Recently, Oakland Community Organizations and the East Bay Asian Youth Center — two long-standing organizations that have worked together for decades to improve conditions for Oakland youths — led a public meeting involving the Oakland Unified School District to demand that our elected and district leaders create a transformed educational future for the city’s high school students.

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  • Two celebrations took place over last week that are significant to both the Christian and Jewish faiths.

    Our co-chairs—Rev. George Cummings, pastor of Imani Community Church, and Richard Speiglman, a member of Kehilla Community Synagogue— took some time to reflect on what Passover and Easter mean to them. They also shared how those traditions relate to the work of OCO.

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  • Rev. Jim Hopkins, pastor of Lakeshore Avenue Baptist Church, was recently featured on the website for the Baptist Peace Fellowship of North America for his involvement in Ceasefire Oakland. His piece, titled “A Reflection on Urban Peacemaking,” sums up the essence of what we mean when we say that our job as a community is to “put love into action.”

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  • On March 25, OCO and EBAYC held a 300-person action at Fremont High School to highlight our partnership and shared vision with our elected and district leaders around creating a transformed educational future for Oakland high school students. With a graduation rate of only 63% for all OUSD students and a dropout rate of 28% for African-American and Latino students, our vision of high school transformation includes equitable Linked Learning that ensures structures in which students feel connected and valued, teachers are supported in developing their practice and have time for collaboration, academics are rigorous and relevant, career pathways include workplace-based learning opportunities, and programs and services address the needs of young people.

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  • Fr. Jesus Nieto-Ruiz was one of the community members invited to the Brooklyn Basin groundbreaking last week. The San Francisco Business Times covered the story.

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  • We want to thank the Oakland Police Foundation for honoring all of the congregations and people who make Ceasefire Oakland work at Saturday’s Neighborhood Champion Awards. A special shoutout goes out to Allen Temple Baptist Church, At Thy Word Ministries, Cityteam Oakland, Cosmopolitan Baptist Church, First Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist Church, Imani Community Church, Lakeshore Avenue Baptist Church, True Vine Ministries, Victory Baptist Church and their pastors. Another shoutout goes to all of the members of the faith community who lead this very important work.

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  • The first test of Oakland Unified School District’s ability to include parents and students in making budget decisions — something now required by state law — happened Wednesday night when about 100 people asked the school board to let schools, rather than the central administration, decide how to spend a pot of money. The students and parents won.

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  • On Feb. 26, the Oakland Unified School District Board agreed to send the $1.5 million promised to schools after our leaders and partners showed up, spoke out and made clear that the district needed to fulfill its promise of making sure basic needs were met at each school. Since our community helped win Prop. 30, Measure J and LCFF, we have been pressing the board to send that money to schools that need it the most. The board has shown leadership and a commitment to equity. However, the board took longer than planned to distribute some of that money to schools, even though boardmembers passed a budgeting policy in January that promised to send more support to students with the greatest need. This is why we’ve continued to fight to get the board to fulfill its promise.

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  • This week, we’ve been busy setting up 1:1’s and research meetings along with the East Bay Asian Youth Center and other partners to take on the task of transforming Oakland Unified School District high schools, just like we did years ago with the small schools movement. This is one of the most important steps in our work, and it’s how we start building power.

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OCO and its affiliates are non-partisan and are not aligned explicitly or implicitly with any candidate or party. We do not endorse or support candidates for office.