Monthly Archives: February 2014

  • On Feb. 26, the Oakland Unified School District Board agreed to send the $1.5 million promised to schools after our leaders and partners showed up, spoke out and made clear that the district needed to fulfill its promise of making sure basic needs were met at each school. Since our community helped win Prop. 30, Measure J and LCFF, we have been pressing the board to send that money to schools that need it the most. The board has shown leadership and a commitment to equity. However, the board took longer than planned to distribute some of that money to schools, even though boardmembers passed a budgeting policy in January that promised to send more support to students with the greatest need. This is why we’ve continued to fight to get the board to fulfill its promise.

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  • Last Wednesday, Feb. 12, over 125 parents, students, community members and clergy from 15 schools and six congregations joined in a Valentine’s Day-themed “Share the Love” action. They held pink, red and white balloons and carried signs calling on OUSD School Board members to “Share the Love – Send Money to Schools Now!” Parent leader Luz Alcaraz from Community United Elementary School (CUES), Skyline High School student and Youth Together leader Shah Turner and Greenleaf Middle School students Noreli Garcia and Sara Renderos spoke on behalf of the group during the public comment portion of the meeting. Once again, they shared concrete examples of the critical and urgent needs facing school communities.

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  • This week, we’ve been busy setting up 1:1’s and research meetings along with the East Bay Asian Youth Center and other partners to take on the task of transforming Oakland Unified School District high schools, just like we did years ago with the small schools movement. This is one of the most important steps in our work, and it’s how we start building power.

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  • Chip Johnson’s recent column (“Oakland neighbors fed up with police services, politicians,” 1/31/14) seems to suggest that a ballot measure in November focused on increased policing and the reduction of property crimes, break-ins and robberies is the answer to fixing the city’s public safety problem. According to a poll we helped conduct of frequent Oakland voters, that doesn’t seem to be the public’s opinion.

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